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Protocol - Organizational Readiness for Change

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Description

Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC) is a 12-item instrument used to determine how well employees at an organization feel they can implement the change in processes required by a proposed intervention. Each item includes a Likert scale from 1 (Disagree) to 5 (Agree). 

Specific Instructions

This protocol is for Implementation Science purposes and should be used when an intervention is planned/being conducted (i.e., pre-implementation phase of an implementation study). It is important to ensure that the survey is administered to multiple individuals within the organization that have different roles relevant to the intervention or decision making around the intervention. This ensures that a broad perspective of opinions are elicited and that barriers/facilitators to the implementation are understood at a variety of levels. 

Before the 12-item ORIC instrument is administered, it is essential to collect information about the organization, the role/job title of the persons at the organization completing the survey, and that person’s characteristics (age, gender, race, and ethnicity at a minimum). Currently, there are no standardized measures for defining the organization or the survey respondent’s role; however some suggestions from the Genomic Medicine Implementation Working Group include the following: (1) for organization: type of organization (hospital, academic medical center, freestanding emergency room/urgent care, Veterans Affairs, federal qualified health center, outpatient clinic, private practice, etc.) and size (number of beds or number of unique patients served, which could be presented as choice of ranges); and (2) for role/job title: provider, clinic administrator, nurse, scheduler, billing personnel, clinic director, department head, dean, president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, patient, technician, etc.

Protocol

1. People who work here feel confident that the organization can get people invested in implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

2. People who work here are committed to implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

3. People who work here feel confident that they can keep track of progress in implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

4. People who work here will do whatever it takes to implement this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

5. People who work here feel confident that the organization can support people as they adjust to this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

6. People who work here want to implement this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

7. People who work here feel confident that they can keep the momentum going in implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

8. People who work here feel confident that they can handle the challenges that might arise in implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

9. People who work here are determined to implement this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

10. People who work here feel confident that they can coordinate tasks so that implementation goes smoothly.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

11. People who work here are motivated to implement this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

12. People who work here feel confident that they can manage the politics of implementing this change.

1[ ]Disagree

2[ ]Somewhat Disagree

3[ ]Neither Agree nor Disagree

4[ ]Somewhat Agree

5[ ]Agree

Protocol Name from Source

Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC)

Availability

Available

Personnel and Training Required

None

Equipment Needs

None

Requirements
Requirement CategoryRequired
Major equipment No
Specialized training No
Specialized requirements for biospecimen collection No
Average time of greater than 15 minutes in an unaffected individual No
Mode of Administration

Program evaluation

Life Stage

Adult

Participants

College students were part of the original study, but the Working Group indicated that this protocol would apply to any employee of the organization being assessed. The expectation is that multiple employees from several different positions within the organization would complete the survey. For example, in the healthcare system employees in the following roles should be considered depending on the intervention: nurses, providers, schedulers, billers, leadership (such as chief medical officer, department chair, clinic administrator, etc.).

Selection Rationale

This protocol was ranked as highly important to genomic medicine implementation by the Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE (IGNITE) network and was developed and deployed as part of a cross network pre-implementation provider survey that is available in the IGNITE toolbox.

Language

English

Standards
StandardNameIDSource
Common Data Elements (CDE) Genomic Medicine Implementation Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change Assessment Score 7409063 CDE Browser
Derived Variables

None

Process and Review

Not applicable

Source

Shea, C. M., Jacobs. S. R., Esserman, D. A., Bruce, K., Y Weiner, B. J. (2014). Organizational readiness for implementing change: a psychometric assessment of a new measure. Implementation Science, 9, 7.

General References

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE (IGNITE): Genomic Medicine Knowledge Base. Available at https://gmkb.org/

Weiner, B. J. (2009). A theory of organizational readiness for change. Implementation Science, 4(67), 10.

Protocol ID

310701

Variables
Export Variables
Variable Name Variable IDVariable DescriptiondbGaP Mapping
Genomic Medicine Implementation
Measure Name

Organizational Readiness for Change

Release Date

September 10, 2020

Definition

An assessment of an organization’s readiness to implement a change to their current processes. The change in this model relates to changes in processes that are important to address prior to implementing an intervention.

Purpose

The Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC) measure originated with Weiner’s theory, which is based on the staff’s ability to initiate change, put forth greater effort, be persistent, and cooperate with one another to implement the change. The measure assesses a variety of employees at an organization that is planning on implementing a new intervention (the change). It includes two subconstructs: one for change efficacy, and one for change commitment. The results can be used to both characterize the organization and help tailor which implementation strategies will be most effective in that organization.    

Keywords

Healthcare provider, healthcare organization, genetic testing, Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change, ORIC, Implementing GeNomics In pracTiCe, IGNITE, Implementation Science